This morning Mark Carney has given his Mansion House speech which was delayed due to the Grenfell Tower fire tragedy. One thing that was unlikely to be in the speech today was the outright cheerleading for the reform of the banking sector which was the basis of his speech back on the 7th of April as the news below emerged.

Barclays PLC and four former executives have been charged with conspiracy to commit fraud and the provision of unlawful financial assistance.

The Serious Fraud Office charges come at the end of a five-year investigation and relate to the bank’s fundraising at the height of 2008’s financial crisis.

Former chief executive John Varley is one of the four ex-staff who will face Westminster magistrates on 3 July.

Firstly let me welcome the news that there will be a trial although the conviction record of the Serious Fraud Office is not good. The problem is that this has taken around nine years about something ( £7 billion raised from Qatar ) which frankly looked to have dubious elements when it took place. What you might call  slooooooooooooow progress of justice.

What about UK interest-rates?

We first got a confession about something we discovered last week.

Different members of the MPC will understandably have different views about the outlook and therefore on the potential timing of any Bank Rate increase.

Actually that is an odd way of saying it as five members voted for no change with some more likely to vote for a cut that a rise in my opinion. Although of course Mark Carney has had trouble before with rises in interest-rates which turn out to be cuts!

Next we got a confirmation of the Governor’s opinion.

From my perspective, given the mixed signals on consumer spending and business investment, and given
the still subdued domestic inflationary pressures, in particular anaemic wage growth, now is not yet the time
to begin that adjustment

Indeed he seems keen to kick this rather awkward issue – because it would mean reversing last August’s Bank Rate cut – as far into the future as possible.

In the coming months, I would like to see the extent to which weaker consumption growth is offset by other components of demand, whether wages begin to firm, and more generally, how the economy reacts to the prospect of tighter financial conditions and the reality of Brexit negotiations.

Indeed if we are willing to ignore both UK economic history and the leads and lags in UK monetary policy then you might be able to believe this.

This stimulus is working. Credit is widely available, the cost of borrowing is near record lows, the economy has outperformed expectations, and unemployment has reached a 40 year low.

Missing from the slap on the back that the Governor has given himself is the most powerful instrument of all which is the value of the UK Pound which has given the UK economy and more sadly inflation a boost. Indeed the initial response to the Governor’s jawboning was to add to the Pound’s fall as it fell below US $1.27 and 1.14 versus the Euro. Should it remain there then the total fall since the night of the EU leave vote then it is equivalent to a 2.75% fall in UK Bank Rate which is a bazooka compared to the 0.25% peashooter cut provided by the Bank of England. So if you believe Mark Carney you are likely not to be a fan of Alice In Wonderland.

“Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.”

Also if he is going to take credit for er “Credit is widely available” then he will be on very thin ice when he next claims the surge in unsecured credit is nothing to do with him.

Carney’s Cronies

Ironically in a way the foreign exchange market was a day late as you see the real change came yesterday.

​The Chancellor of the Exchequer has announced the appointment of Professor Silvana Tenreyro as an external member of the Monetary Policy Committee (MPC).  Silvana will be appointed for a three year term which will take effect from 7 July 2017.

There are several issues here, if I start with British female economists then that is another slap in the face for them as none have been judged suitable for a decade. Next came the thought that I had never previously heard of her which turned to concern as we were told she came from “academic excellence” in an era where Ivory Towers have consistently crumbled and fallen along the lines of Mount Doom in the Lord of the Rings. But after a little research one could see why she had been appointed. From a survey taken by the Centre For Macroeconomics.

Question Do you agree that the benefits of reforming the monetary system to allow materially negative policy interest rates outweigh the possible costs?

Agree. Confident. Reforming the monetary system to allow negative policy interest rates will equip the BoE with an additional tool to face potential crises in the future.

Does “reforming the monetary system” sound somewhat like someone who will support restrictions on the use of cash currency and maybe its banning? She is also a fan of QE ( Quantitative Easing ) style policies.

Question Do you agree that central banks should continue to use the unconventional tools of monetary policy deployed in response to the global financial crisis as part of monetary policy under normal economic conditions?

Agree. Confident. A wider set of policy tools would give mature and credible central banks like the BoE more flexibility to respond to changing economic conditions.

What is it about her apparent support for negative interest-rate and QE that attracted the attention of Mark Carney? Of course in a world after the woeful failure of Forward Guidance and indeed the litany of forecasting errors he was probably grateful to find someone who still calls the Bank of England “credible”!

Comment

We have a few things to consider and let me start with the reaction function of foreign exchange markets. The real news was yesterday as a fan of negative interest-rates was appointed to the Bank of England but the UK Pound waited until Mark Carney repeated his views of only Thursday to fall!

Meanwhile there was this from Governor Carney.

Monetary policy cannot prevent the weaker real income growth likely to accompany the transition to new
trading arrangements with the EU. But it can influence how this hit to incomes is distributed between job losses and price rises.

His views on the EU leave vote are hardly news although some are trying to present them as such. You might think after all the forecasting errors and Forward Guidance failures he would be quiet about such things. But my main issue here is the sort of Phillips Curve way we are presented a choice between “job losses” and “price rises” Just as all credibility of such thinking has collapsed even for those with a very slow response function in fact one slow enough to be at the Serious Fraud Office. He is also contradicting himself as it was only a few months ago we were being told by him that wage growth was on the up. Although that February Inflation Forecast press conference did see signs that the normally supine press corps were becoming unsettled about a Governor previously described as a “rockstar central banker” and “George Clooney” look a like.

Governor, back in August the forecast for GDP for this year
was 0.8%. Now it’s being forecast at 2.0%. That’s a really
hefty adjustment. What went wrong with your initial
forecast?

He may not be that bothered as you see much of today’s speech was in my opinion part of his job application to replace Christine Lagarde at the IMF.

With many concerned that global trade is taking local jobs, protectionist sentiments are once again rising
across the advanced world. Excessive trade and current account imbalances are now politically as well as
economically unsustainable.

Number Crunching