On the face of it yesterday was an example of “the same old song” at the Bank of England in more than one respect. Firstly something that seemed to get ignored in the melee was that the vote was the same as the last time around which was to continue with the QE ( Quantitative Easing) programme and 7 votes to keep interest-rates unchanged with 2 for a 0.25% hike. The QE vote was apposite as it is currently ongoing with around £3.3 billion being reinvested earlier this week.

The next example of the “same old song” came with a somewhat familiar refrain in the official Minutes of the policy meeting.

All MPC members continued to judge that, if the economy were to follow a path broadly consistent with the August Inflation Report central projection, then monetary policy could need to be tightened by a somewhat greater extent over the forecast period than current market expectations.

This has the familiar promise but as usual had “if” and “could” as part of it. But then there was something new.

A majority of MPC members judged that, if the economy continued to follow a path consistent with the prospect of a continued erosion of slack and a gradual rise in underlying inflationary pressure then, with the further lessening in the trade-off that this would imply, some withdrawal of monetary stimulus was likely to be appropriate over the coming months in order to return inflation sustainably to target.

As they are currently refilling the QE programme and in the past have said that they would raise Bank Rate before changing the QE total this was “central bankingese” for an interest-rate rise. There are obvious issues here but let us park them for now and look for an explanation of why?

The economy is doing better than expected

The initial explanation trips over its own feet.

Since the August Report, the relatively limited news on activity points, if anything, to a slightly stronger picture than anticipated. GDP rose by 0.3% in the second quarter, as expected in the MPC’s August projections,

So we simultaneously did better and the same as expected?! Let us move onto something where this may actually be true.

The unemployment rate has continued to decline, to 4.3%, its lowest in over 40 years and a little lower than forecast in August. Survey indicators are consistent with continued strength in employment growth.

Also no matter how often the output gap theories of the Ivory Towers are proved wrong they are given another throw of the dice just in case.

Overall, the latest indicators are consistent with UK demand growing a little in excess of this diminished rate of potential supply growth, and the continued erosion of what is now a fairly limited degree of spare capacity.

Problems with this view

If you take that as a case for a Bank Rate rise there are two immediate issues to my mind. Let us return to the “output gap”.

Evidence continues to accumulate that the rate of potential supply growth has slowed in recent years.

Actually if you look at the employment situation in the UK exactly the reverse has been true as I pointed out in my “the boy who cried wolf” article on Monday. We have been told that unemployment rates of 7%, 6-6.5%, 5% and then 4.5% are significant as the Bank of England theorists attempt to run in quicksand. If we look at the flip side of this potential supply growth in terms of employment has surged as we have moved to record levels.

Also there is the issue of wage growth which of course is interrelated to the paragraph above. We are told this.

Underlying pay growth had shown some signs of recovery, albeit remaining modest.

They have also looked into the detail and concluded this.

Empirical estimates by Bank staff suggested that these may have depressed annual growth of average weekly earnings by around 0.7 percentage points ( New data from the ONS suggested that compositional effects related to factors including the skills, industry and occupational mix of the workforce had pushed down average pay growth in the year to Q2. )

Let me bring this up to date as Gertjan Vlieghe is giving  a speech as I type this and he has reinforced this theme.

Wage growth is not as weak as it was earlier in the year: over the past 5 months, annualised growth in private sector pay has averaged just over 3%. And some pay-related surveys also suggest a modest rise in wage pressure in recent months.

Let me give you a critique of that firstly as shown below.

Actually that is the overall rather than just the private-sector picture but if we look at that and use Vlieghe’s figures it looks to me that he has not include the latest numbers for July where there was a dip in bonus payments as I pointed out on Wednesday. So total annualised wage growth fell from 3.2% to 1.4% and it is odd that Gertjan has apparently missed this as you see he was given the data early.

As to the possible compositional effects let me explain with an example sent to me on twitter.

Janet & John are each paid 100. After good year pay goes to 110; so good they employ Timmy and pay him 80. Ave pay (now for 3) unch at 100 ( @NelderMead ).

Nice to see I am not the only person who was taught to read with the Janet and John books! But the catch is that we keep being told this and then like a mirage it fades away as a different reality emerges. The Bank of England has been a serial optimist on the wages front and has been left red-faced time and time again.

Comment

One thing I welcome about the news flow over the past 24 hours from the Bank of England is the way that it has pushed the UK Pound £ higher. It has gone above 1.13 versus the Euro and 150 to the Japanese Yen and most importantly above US $1.35 which influences what we pay for most commodities. This response to a possible tightening embarrasses those who claimed the Bank of England easing did not weaken the Pound £ last summer. Not the best timing for those saying parity with the Euro was just around the corner either.

Moving onto the economics then there is something more than a little awkward in 9 supposedly independent people suddenly having the same thoughts. It is almost as if they are Carney’s cronies. It is hard not to sing along with Luther Vandross on their behalf.

I told my girl bye-bye
But I really didn’t mean it
Said, ?I met somebody new so fine?
But I really didn’t mean it

If you read the final part of the Gertjan Vlieghe speech there are grounds for him to change his mind.

If these data trends of reducing slack, rising pay pressure, strengthening household spending and robust global growth continue, the appropriate time for a rise in Bank Rate might be as early as in the coming months.

After all he told us this only in April.

I will argue that there is an important distinction to be drawn between good monetary policy and making accurate forecasts

Remember when Ben Broadbent told us he would pick and choose amongst the data ( just after being wrong yet again).

Also it is hard to forget these previous episodes.

Mark Carney Feb 2016 “the MPC judges that it is more likely than not that Bank Rate will need to rise over our forecast period”

He of course later cut Bank Rate and before that there was this.

Mark Carney June 2014 An interest-rate rise ” could happen sooner than markets currently expect. ”

So let us welcome a stronger Pound £ as we note that Forward Guidance has been anything but. Let me finish with some Friday music from Prince which has been removed from the Bank of England play list.

This is what it sounds like
When doves cry