Yesterday was a rather extraordinary day at the Bank of England and in some respects lived up to the Super Thursday moniker although by no means in the way intended. The media dropped that phrase at exactly the wrong moment. The irony was that for once they may have done the right thing in not raising interest-rates but what this exposed was the ineptitude and failures of their past rhetoric promises and hints. The regime of Forward Guidance can not have been much more of a failure as it found itself being adjusted yet again.

the MPC judges that an ongoing, modest tightening of monetary policy over the forecast period will be
appropriate to return inflation sustainably to its target at a conventional horizon.

Let us mark the obvious problem with the use of ongoing when the Bank Rate is still at the emergency level of 0.5% the Term Funding Scheme is at circa £127 billion and we have £435 billion of QE Gilt holdings and look at what they said in February and the emphasis is mine.

The Committee judges that, were the economy to evolve broadly in line with the February Inflation Report projections, monetary policy would need to be tightened somewhat earlier and by a somewhat greater extent over the forecast period than anticipated at the time of the November Report,

So the timing element was wrong and so was the amount which doesn’t really leave much does it?

But things got worse at the press conference because in his attempt to explain this Governor Carney exposed Forward Guidance as an emperor with no clothes. In an exchange with Harry Daniels of LiveSquawk Governor Carney told us that his words were really only for financial markets and implied that they were big enough boys and girls to make their own views. He then contrasted with the ordinary person clearly implying they would not. Seeing as Forward Guidance was supposed to connect with the ordinary person and business Governor Carney torpedoed his own ship there. Also when he later tried to claim people and businesses do listen to him he unwittingly admitted he had misled them,

The people we speak to first and foremost are households and businesses across the country. [They] don’t trade short-sterling. They are not fixated on whether we raise rates on May 10 or at the end of June ( The Times).

They might reasonably have been fixated on his rate rise rhetoric back in June 2014 after all if they could have nearly taken out a couple of 2-year fixed-rate mortgages since then to protect themselves against the interest-rate rises which never happened.

A bizarre element was added on the issue of him talking at 6 pm to the BBC when many UK markets are closed as the Governor tried to claim it was okay because some markets such as the UK Pound £ were traded 24/7. This of course did not address at all the ones that are closed or the lack of liquidity at such times in the ones that are.

Weather or whether?

This got the blame.

The MPC’s central assessment is that it largely reflects the former, and that the underlying pace of growth remains more resilient than the headline data suggest.

The problem here is of course if they really believed that then they should have raised interest-rates! Also it directly contrasted with what our official statisticians had told us a few hours before.

Today’s figures support previous estimates showing the economy was very sluggish in the first quarter of 2018, with little impact overall from the bad weather.

Unreliable Boyfriend

This subject was raised several times and one of them got a rather bizarre response.

Shade from MC: “The only people who throw that term [unreliable boyfriend] at me are in this room” ( @birdyworld )

We do not even need to look beyond the boundaries of this website to know that such a statement is untrue and even the BBC uses the term. The Governor had opened the press conference by shiftily looking around the room before as several people rather amusingly suggested to me talking out of both sides of his mouth. Indeed the man formerly praised for his good looks and for being a rock star central banker seems to have lost the female vote too if this from Blonde Money is any guide.

Carney the ever unreliable boyfriend

There was an alternative view which I doubt the Governor will prefer.

The people outside the room say “who are you” ( @birdyworld )

Especially as it is from someone who thinks he has done a good job.

Wages

There was another odd turn here as Governor Carney went into full Ivory Tower mode and said that the Monetary Policy Committee only looked at regular wages. As it is not that frequent an event let me echo the words of Danny Blanchflower on this subject.

idiotic – workers only care about what is in their pay packet – so you take out the part of pay that varies and then tell us what is left doesn’t vary No other country in the world uses such a dumb measure.

Even worse the Governor tried to say that wages had progressed in line with the forecasts of the Bank of England but this is only if you cherry pick the data. For example the latest month for which we have figures is February and if you take the Governor’s line and look at private-sector regular pay the annual rate of increase was 3%. However if you look at pay across the economy ( and as it happens the private-sector)the annual rate of increase was 2.3%. Will people ignore what was once called “the pound in your pocket” and instead break up the notes and coins into separate piles?

The absent-minded professor

Ben Broadbent is called into play at the press conferences if the going gets tough. His role is twofold being partly to expound widely on minor details to waste time and in a related effort to make the viewers and attendees drowsy if not numb. Sadly I was not that to point out that his rhetoric on Asia ignored Japan where many fear a contraction in the first quarter GDP data due you guessed it to the weather.

He has also been on the Today programme this morning on BBC Radio Four. This seems unwise as people have just got up and do not want to be sent back to sleep but if we move on from that there is this.

BoE’s Broadbent: Message Is That Rate Hikes Will Be Gradual ( @LiveSquawk )

How long can you keep saying that when in net terms there have not been any?

It is entirely the sensible thing to do, to wait to see whether we are right that the economy will bounce back from here, and for me the decision was straightforward

So it was the weather or it wasn’t? Moving on from that is the contrast with August 2016 when Ben appeared somewhat panic-stricken and could not cut rates fast enough where was the waiting for a ” bounce back from here,” then Ben? He also wanted to cut further in November 2016 before of course even he was calmed by the actual data.

On a deeper level I would just like to point out that it was wrong to move Professor Broadbent from being an external member to an internal one. Otherwise external member of the MPC may be influenced by potential sinecures from the Governor which makes their existence pointless.

Comment

The road to a Bank Rate cut and possibly more QE Gilt purchases is simple and it merely involves the current weak patch for the economy persisting. As I have pointed out before the monetary growth numbers have been weakening which suggests the summer and early autumn may not be that good. It is also true that more than a few of our trading partners are seeing a weaker phase too as for example we saw this from France on Wednesday.

Manufacturing output fell sharply over the first
quarter of 2018 (−1.8%)

That leaves it with a similar position to the UK where a better phase seems to have ended at least for now. We know from August 2016 that it will not take much more of this for the Bank of England to look at easing policy in sharp contrast to the nearly four years of unfulfilled Forward Guidance about rises.

I don’t care if you never come home,
I don’t mind if you just keep on
Rowing away on a distant sea,
‘Cause I don’t love you and you don’t love me. ( Eric Clapton)

Meanwhile the consequences continue to build up.

Forty-somethings are now almost twice as likely to be renting from a private landlord than they were 10 years ago.

Rising UK house prices have left many middle-age workers unable to afford a first home,  ( BBC )