A rush of economic data over the past 24 hours allows us as to follow Sylvia’s “I’m off to sunny Spain”. This gives us another perspective as we switch from the third largest economy ( Italy) yesterday where economic growth has ground to a halt again whereas in the fourth largest it is doing this according to the statistics office.

The Spanish GDP registers a growth of 0.6% in the third quarter of 2018 to the previous quarter in terms of volume. This rate is similar to that registered in the second quarter of the year. The annual growth of GDP stands at 2.5%, a rate similar to that of the quarter preceding.

As you can see two countries which were part of the Euro area crisis are now seeing very different circumstances. At the moment Spain is a case of steady as she goes because quarterly growth has been 0.6% for each of 2018’s quarters so far.

If we back for some perspective we are reminded of the trouble that hit Spain. It did begin to recover from the initial impact of the credit crunch but then the Euro area crisis arrived at economic growth headed into negative territory in 2011-13 peaking at a quarterly decline of 1% at the end of 2013. This was followed by improvements in 2014 such that quarterly growth reached 1.2% in the first quarter of 2015. Since then quarterly growth has been strong for these times varying between the current 0.6% and the 0.9% of the opening of 2017.

So we see that Spain saw the hard times with annual economic growth falling to -3.5% late in 2012 but can rebound as illustrated by the 4.1% of late 2015. Those who have followed my updates on Greece will recall that I often refer to the fact that after its precipitous and sustained decline it should have had in terms of economic recovery a “V-shaped” rally in economic growth. Well Spain gives an example of that whereas Greece has not. If we switch to yesterday’s theme Spain is a much happier case for the “broad-based economic expansion” claims of Mario Draghi and the ECB because whilst economic growth has slowed it is still good and is pulling the Euro area average higher.

Inflation

If we continue with the mandate of the ECB we were told this by Spain statistics yesterday.

The annual change in the flash estimate of the CPI stands at 2.3% in October, the same registered in September
The annual rate of the flash estimate of the HICP is 2.3%.

So inflation is over target and has been picking up in 2018 with the current mix described below.

In this behavior, the decrease in the prices of electricity stand out, compared to the increase
registered in 2017, and the rise in gas prices.

From the point of the ECB if we look at inflation above target and the economic growth rate and point out that it is withdrawing the stimulus provided by monthly QE. However the water gets somewhat choppier if we look at another inflation measure.

The annual variation rate of the Housing Price Index (HPI) in the second quarter of 2018 increased six tenths, standing at 6.8%. By type of housing, the variation rate of new housing stood at 5.7%, remaining unchanged
as compared with the previous quarter. On the other hand, the annual variation of second-hand housing increased by seven tenths, up to 7.0%.

The first impact is the rate of annual change and this is more awkward for the ECB as it is hard not to think of the appropriateness of its -0.4% deposit rate for Spain. Its impact on mortgage rates especially when combined with the other monetary easing has put Spain on a road which led to “trouble,trouble,trouble” last time around. For those of you wondering what Spanish mortgage rates are here via Google Translate is this morning’s update.

In mortgages on homes, the average interest rate is 2.62% (4.3%) lower than August 2017) and the average term of 24 years. 59.8% of mortgages on housing is made at a variable rate and 40.2% at a fixed rate. Mortgages at a fixed rate they experience an increase of 3.9% in the annual rate. The average interest rate at the beginning is 2.43% for mortgages on variable-rate homes. (with a decrease of 5.5%) and 2.99% for fixed rate (3.1% lower).

As fixed-interest mortgages are only around half a percent per annum higher the number taking variable-rate ones seems high. However I have to admit my view is that Mario Draghi has no intention of raising interest-rates on his watch and the overall Euro area GDP news from yesterday backs that up. Of course we are switching from fact to opinion there and as a strategy I would suggest that any narrowing of the gap between the two types gives an opportunity to lock in what are in historical terms very low levels.

Labour Market

The economic growth phase that Spain has seen means we have good news here.

The number of employed increases by 183,900 people in the third quarter of 2018 compared to the previous quarter (0.95%) and stands at 19,528,000. In terms seasonally adjusted, the quarterly variation is 0.48%. Employment has grown by 478,800 people (2.51%) in the last 12 months.

Higher employment does not necessarily mean lower unemployment but fortunately in this instance it does.

The number of unemployed persons decreased this quarter by 164,100 people (-4.70%) and it stands at
3,326,000. In seasonally adjusted terms, the quarterly variation is -2.29%. In recent months unemployment has decreased by 405,800 people (-10.87%).  The unemployment rate stands at 14.55%, which is 73 hundredths less than in the previous quarter. In the last year this rate has fallen by 1.83 points.

But whilst the news is indeed better we get some perspective by the fact that the unemployment rate at 14.55% is not only still in double-digits but is well over that Euro area average. Indeed it is more than 10% higher than in the UK or US and around 12% higher than Japan.

As to the youth employment situation the good news is that the number of 16-19 year olds employed rose by nearly 12% to 165.500 over the past year. However some 137,800 are recorded as unemployed.

Comment

The Spanish economy has provided plenty of good news for the Euro area in the past few years, but that does not mean that there are no concerns. We have already looked at the issue of house prices and the past fears which arise from their development. Also for those who consider this to be because of the “internal competitiveness” model will be worried by this described by El Pais.

External demand, which helped in the worst moments to pull the Spanish economy, subtracted 0.5 points per year from GDP. And in the quarter, exports fell by 1.8%, entering for the first time negative rates since the third quarter of 2013. While it is true that imports also decreased by 1.2%.

Some of this no doubt relates to the automotive sector which for those who have not followed developments has been a success for Spain albeit that some of the gains have come from cannibalising production from elsewhere in the Euro area. An example of a troubled 2018 has been provided by Ecomotor today by revealing that VW Navarra has cut its production target by 10,000 cars for 2018. Oh and I nearly forgot to mention the Spanish banks especially the smaller ones hit by the court ruling on Stamp Duty.

But returning to the good news the economic growth means that Spain has seen the debt to GDP ratio that had nudged above 100% drop back to 98.3%. That is the road to a ten-year bond yield less than half that of Italy at 1.56% in spite of the fact that the planned fiscal deficit at 2.7% is higher.