Two days before the Nov. 6 midterm elections, Georgia Secretary of State and Republican gubernatorial candidate Brian Kemp revealed on Sunday that his office is opening an investigation into the Georgia Democratic Party on allegations that it attempted to hack the state's voting system, including allegations of possible cyber crimes. 

Abrams

Kempe, whose office announced the investigation in a Sunday morning news release, didn't reveal any details of the probe, which comes on the heels of a court victory by Democrats, who successfully challenged the state's attempt to de-register 50,000 voters under the state's "exact match" voter ID law, according to the Daily Caller.

"While we cannot comment on the specifics of an ongoing investigation, I can confirm that the Democratic Party of Georgia is under investigation for possible cyber-crimes," Kempe press secretary Candice Broce said in the release. Both the Department of Homeland Security and the FBI have been alerted.

The state Democratic Party has called the allegations "100% false" and "an abuse of power" by Kempe. According to the Atlanta Journal Constitution, a computer scientist and attorney who are currently suing Kempe said that the lawsuit is "an attempt to distract from a report about vulnerabilities in the state's voter registration website."

The "vulnerabilities" could potentially allow anybody to access the voting records of individual voters.

Poll numbers between Kempe and his opponent, Democrat Stacy Abrams, have tightened to within a two percentage point margin as Abrams has benefited from several celebrity endorsements, including the support of Oprah Winfrey, who joined Abrams in knocking on doors last week.

The Daily Caller quoted Abrams as saying the lawsuit was a "desperate attempt" to sway the vote in Kempe's favor ahead of the election.

"I’ve heard nothing about it, and my reaction would be that this is a desperate attempt on the part of my opponent to distract people from the fact that two different federal judges found him derelict in his duties and have forced him to accept absentee ballots to be counted and those who are being held captive by the exact match system to be allowed to vote," Abrams said.

For many Georgia voters, news of the investigation will not be taken lightly. According to a poll conducted by the AJC and a local TV station, many voters in the state are concerned about the integrity of its elections, including fears about tampering and ineligible voters casting ballots.