Peter Schiff doesn’t mince words when he declared the precarious state the United States economy has found itself in. As SHTFplan.com's Mac Slavo notes, Schiff says “the truth is we don’t have a booming economy,” and he’s not the only one who has noticed.

October was the worst month for global equities in more than six years. Globally, stock markets lost 7.5%, their worst month since May 2012. Even with the late rally, it was the biggest monthly decline in the Nasdaq since 2008.

“All of the bulls were out in force on the financial networks claiming that the correction is over. Everybody was confident that the lows are in, that the big back-to-back rally is proof and you better buy now, otherwise you’re going to miss the rally, and this is the typical correction and now it has run its course. And you know what? If this really was the end of the correction, most likely there wouldn’t be so many people that were so confident that it’s over. You’d have a lot more fear, especially on Halloween. The fact that there is no fear, to me, shows that it’s more likely that this is not the end of the correction, but the beginning of the bear market and that this rally is a correction.” –Peter Schiff via Seeking Alpha

Schiff is well-known for predicting the 2008 financial crisis, but that becomes slightly more real when hearing him say that the job market if a gigantic bubble. Schiff says that jobs are just one more bubble that’s about to burst.

Two hundred thousand jobs a month in an economy the size of ours, especially given how few people, or what a large percentage of the workforce is not working, we should be creating a lot more than 200,000 jobs per month. But we’re not.”

Even though wages are rising for people that have jobs, the cost of living is rising faster. But the cost of servicing their debt is rising even faster than that.”

As far as the job growth goes, the mainstream keeps pointing to it as a sign of a booming economy. But as Peter pointed out, we’re borrowing a tremendous amount of money to get this jobs growth.

Clearly, if we’re running record budget deficits, and record trade deficits, and everybody is levered up, you know, spending all of that borrowed money creates some jobs. But those jobs are not sustainable because the debt is not sustainable. The consumption based on debt is not sustainable.”

Increasing prices is a direct result of a decade of Federal Reserve easy money policy, Schiff accurately says. Over the last 10 years, the Fed has printed trillions of dollars out of thin air.

The point is we’re running record trade deficits. We’re running huge government budget deficits. The GOP cut income taxes. We’re giving everybody money to spend, so people are spending.

And in the short-run, yes, you can goose up the economy and you can create some unsustainable jobs. But just because we have these jobs today doesn’t mean these jobs are going to be here tomorrow.”

And remember, Schiff concludes: "that every boom has been followed by a bust.”