Yesterday saw something of a change in the way that the Euro area would deal with a future crisis. A special purpose vehicle or SPV that was created in response to the post credit crunch crisis is expanding its role. This is the ESM or European Stability Mechanism which was the second effort in this area as the initial effort called the European Financial Stability Fund or EFSF turned out to be anything but that. However that was then and this is now at let me explain the driving force behind all of this which the EFSF highlighted in a press release on the 9th of this month.

The European Financial Stability Facility (EFSF) raised €4 billion today in a new 5-year benchmark bond, completing the EFSF’s funding needs for 2018………..The spread of the 0.20% bond, maturing on 17 January 2024, was fixed at mid swaps minus 13 basis points, for a reoffer yield of 0.258%. The order book was in excess of €5.3 billion.

As you can see it can borrow on extraordinarily cheap terms as it borrows at 0.26% for five years. Back in the day there were questions as to what interest-rate these collective Euro area institutions would be able to borrow at? We now know that they have been able to borrow if not at Germany;s rate ( it was around -0.15% on that day) at what we might consider to be a Germanic rate. Or as Middle of the Road put it.

Chirpy chirpy cheep cheep chirp

In a way it is extraordinary but amidst the turmoil these two vehicles which whilst they still have differences are treated by markets pretty much as they are one have been able to do this. From the 2017 annual report.

The ESM has a strong financial capacity. The EFSF
and the ESM together have disbursed €273 billion in
loans since inception. The ESM has an unused lending
capacity of €380 billion, after taking into account
the maximum possible disbursements to Greece.

As you can see there is still plenty of ammunition in the locker and once the Euro area switched course from punishing nations ( too late for Greece) it allowed it to trumpet things like the one below.

As a result of ESM and EFSF lending terms, our five beneficiary countries saved a total of €16.6 billion in debt service payments in 2017, compared to the assumed market cost of funding. Greece alone saved €12 billion last year, the equivalent of 6.7% of the country’s GDP.

Yet it is in fact a geared SPV which is another of its attractions until of course the day that really matters.

to ensure the preservation of the paid-in capital of €80.4 billion.1 This money was paid in by the 19 euro area countries, and is by far the largest paid-in capital of any IFI.

Okay so what changes are planned?

This was explained on Friday in Les Echos by ESM Chair Klaus Regling.

The ESM will play a more important role in financial crisis management together with the European Commission. At the beginning of the crisis, there was the troika consisting of the Commission, the ECB and the IMF. With the third programme for Greece in 2015, the ESM was added and it became a quartet. In the future, in principle, a tandem composed of the Commission and the ESM will deal with assistance programmes for countries in financial difficulty. The IMF and the ECB will play a less important role than 8 years ago.

The IMF move seems sensible on two counts. Firstly it should never have got itself involved in the Euro area in the first place as it has a balance of payments surplus. Secondly and this is of course interrelated to the first point the Euro area cannot always rely on it having a French managing director. The ECB may be more subtle as we mull whether its (large) balance sheet will be deployed in other roles? As an aside it is hardly a sign of success if you have to keep changing the names.

The banks

As we know “the precious” must always be protected in case anyone tries to throw it into Mount Doom. There are obvious issues in Greece to be dealt with.

Both Piraeus Bank and the National Bank of Greece dropped to all time record lows today. ( h/t @nikoschrysoloras )

Actually Piraeus Bank has dropped another 5% today so he could rinse and repeat his message. It seems that the triumphant last bailout is going the way of the previous triumphant bailout. Also there is my old employer Deutsche Bank which has got near to breaking the 8 Euro barrier today which will help to bring the Germans on board. Adding to the fear about its derivatives book is the allegation that some US $150 billion of the Danske money laundering scandal went through the books of  DB’s US subsidiary. Sometimes this sort of thing gets really mind-boggling as we observe the period when Danske had a bigger market capitalisation than DB partly driven by money laundering that was facilitated by DB. Do I have that right?

Anyway in the future Klaus Regling may well be stepping in. From his interview with Les Echos.

In June, we agreed that the ESM will provide the backstop. Its volume will be the same as the volume of the Single Resolution Fund. This is being built up with bank contributions and it will reach 1% of bank deposits at the end of 2023, in other words €55 to 60 billion. The decision to use this security net in case the resolution fund is insufficient has to be taken very quickly, even if the parliaments of some countries need to be consulted.

They seem to be hurrying along for some reason…..

 This will be in 2024 at the latest and it could be earlier.

Exactly how can the troubled banking sector which in relative terms is not far off as weak as it was when the credit crunch hit pay for all of this?

Italy

Regular readers will be aware that due to their astonishing track record we take careful note of official denials. Well on the 6th of October the ESM wrote to the Editor of Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung.

The claim that the ESM is guaranteeing Italy’s state debt is wrong. Italy has never lost access to international financial markets. Therefore, Italy has never had a rescue programme with the ESM or its temporary predecessor institution, the EFSF. For the same reason, the ESM has neither guaranteed Italy’s state debt nor has it granted Italy any emergency loans.

Of course not as Italy would have to do as it is told first and presently there is little or no sign of that. But one day…

Comment

There is a fair bit to consider here and the likely new role of the ESM is at the top. It is convenient for politicians to pass their responsibilities to technocrats as the latter can take the bad news from a country bailout. However whilst it will need to be approved by the 19 Euro area parliaments these things have a powerful tendency to turn out different to the description on the tin. Just look at the Greek bailout for example.

Whereas the banking moves seem more sotto voce in this but as we seem to be in the middle of if not a crisis a phase where we have seen bank share prices tumble we need to be on alert. It is not just the Euro area girding its loins as for example it was only a few short months ago we were noting plans for more capital for the Bank of England. It is quite an indictment of the bank bailout culture that all these years later we seem to be as David Bowie so aptly put it.

Where’s your shame
You’ve left us up to our necks in it
Time may change me
But you can’t trace time