This morning has opened with some good news for the UK economy and it has come from the Nationwide Building Society. So let us get straight to it.

Annual house price growth slows to its
weakest pace since February 2013. Prices fell 0.7% in the month of December,after taking account of seasonal factors.

I wish those that own their own house no ill but the index level of 425.7 in December compares with 107.1 when the monthly series first began in January of 1991, so you can see that it has been a case of party on for house prices. If you want a longer-term perspective then the quarterly numbers which began at 100 at the end of 1952 were 11.429.5 and the end of the third quarter of 2018. I think we can call that a boom! Putting it another way the house price to earnings ratio is 5.1 which is not far off the pre credit crunch peak of 5.4.

The actual change is confirmed as being below both the rate of consumer inflation and wage growth later.

UK house price growth slowed noticeably as 2018 drew to a close, with prices just 0.5% higher than December 2017.

Also the Nationwide which claims to be the UK’s second largest mortgage lender is not particularly optimistic looking ahead.

In particular, measures of consumer confidence weakened
in December and surveyors reported a further fall in new
buyer enquiries towards the end of the year. While the
number of properties coming onto the market also slowed,
this doesn’t appear to have been enough to prevent a
modest shift in the balance of demand and supply in favour
of buyers.

Although they then seem to change their mind.

It is likely that the recent slowdown is attributable to the
impact of the uncertain economic outlook on buyer
sentiment, given that it has occurred against a backdrop of
solid employment growth, stronger wage growth and
continued low borrowing costs.

The economic environment is seeing some ch-ch-changes right now but let us first sort out some number-crunching where each UK country has done better than the average.

Amongst the home nations Northern Ireland recorded the
strongest growth in 2018, with prices up 5.8%, though
Wales also recorded a respectable 4% gain. By contrast,
Scotland saw a more modest 0.9% increase, while England
saw the smallest rise of just 0.7% over the year.

They have I think switched from the monthly to the quarterly data here as that average was up by 1.3%.

The UK economy

We have now received the last of the UK Markit Purchasing Manager Index surveys so let us get straight to it.

At 51.6 in December, the seasonally adjusted All Sector
Output Index was up slightly from 51.0 in November.
However, the latest reading pointed to the second-slowest
rate of business activity expansion since July 2016.

I am a little surprised they mention July 2016 so perhaps they are hoping we have short memories and do not recall how it turned into a lesson about being careful about indices driven by sentiment. This was mostly driven by the manufacturing sector which had Markit looking for a scapegoat.

December saw the UK PMI rise to a six-month high,
following short-term boosts to inventory holdings and
inflows of new business as companies stepped up their
preparations for a potentially disruptive Brexit.
Stocks of purchases and finished goods both rose
at near survey-record rates, while stock-piling by
customers at home and abroad took new orders growth
to a ten-month high.

So preparation is bad as presumably would be no preparation. It is especially awkward for their uncertainty theme which was supposed to be reducing output. But let us move onto the main point here which is that the UK is apparently managing some economic growth but not a lot. This matters if we now switch to the wider economic outlook.

The world economy

As I have been typing this the Chinese cavalry have arrived. Reuters.

China’s just cut bank reserve requirement ratios by 100 bps, releasing an estimated RMB1.5t in liquidity by Jan 25. expected this, but argues the central bank can do a lot more – like cutting benchmark guidance lending rates.

Reuters are understandably pleased about finding someone who got something right. But the deeper issue is the economic prognosis behind this which we dipped into on Wednesday and is that the Chinese economy is slowing. For those wondering about what the People’s Bank of China is up to it is expanding the money supply via reducing the reserves banks have to hold which allows them to lend more. So they are acting on the quantity of money rather than the price or interest-rate of it. This relies on the banks then actually lending more. Or more specifically not just lending to those in distress.

Then there is the Euro area which according to the Markit PMIs is doing this.

The eurozone economy moved down another gear
at the end of 2018, with growth down considerably
from the elevated rates at the start of the year.
December saw business activity grow at the
weakest rate since late-2014 as inflows of new
work barely rose……….The data are consistent with eurozone GDP rising by just under 0.3% in the fourth quarter, but with quarterly growth momentum slowing to 0.15% in December.

We need to rake these numbers as a broad sweep rather than going for specific accuracy as, for example, Germany is described as being at a five-year low which requires amnesia about the 0.2% GDP contraction in the third quarter of this year.

Comment

If we switch to our leading indicator for the UK which is money supply growth we see a by now familiar pattern. The two signals of broad money growth have diverged a bit but neither M4 growth at 2.2% in November or M4 lending growth at 3.5% are especially optimistic. That only gets worse once you subtract inflation from it. Or to put it another way in ordinary times we would be in a situation where a bank rate cut would be expected.

What does the Bank of England crystal ball or what is called Forward Guidance in one of Governor Mark Carney’s policy innovations tell us?

The MPC had judged in November that, were the economy to develop broadly in line with its Inflation
Report projections, an ongoing tightening of monetary policy over the forecast period, at a gradual pace and to a
limited extent, would be appropriate to return inflation sustainably to the 2% target at a conventional horizon.

So “I agree with Mark” seems to be the most popular phase which should make taxpayers wonder why we bother with the other 8 salaries? Indeed one of them will be in quite a panic now as back in May Deputy Governor Ramsden told us that 8.8% consumer credit growth was “Weak” so I dread to think what he makes of the current 7.1%. Although @NicTrades has a different view.

that’s China fast!

So that is how a promised Bank Rate rise begins to metamorphose into a Bank Rate cut which will be presented as “unexpected” ( as opposed to on here where we have been watching the journey of travel for nearly a year) and a “surprise”, just like the last time this happened just over 2 years ago.

Let me finish by welcoming the addition of two women to the Financial Policy Committee as there is of course nothing like a Dame.

Dame Colette Bowe and Dame Jayne-Anne Gadhia have been appointed as external members of ‘s Financial Policy Committee (FPC)

So sadly the diversity agenda only adds female members of the establishment to the existing list of male establishment appointees. That went disastrously with the Honorable Charlotte Hogg who proved that even being the daughter of an Earl and a Baroness cannot allow you to avoid family issues, especially when you forget you have a brother.